nuclearinfo.net

Everything you want to know about Nuclear Power.

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Contributors to this site

About this site

This website was developed by a group of Physicists from the School of Physics at the University of Melbourne in Australia. The aim is to provide authoritative information about Nuclear Power. The group has no particular vested interest in Nuclear Power other than to ensure that people fully understand the risks and benefits of both employing or not employing Nuclear Power for energy generation. The information has been obtained with quantitative analysis and has been subject to peer-review following the Scientific Method. To this end Scientists and Professionals from different fields were invited to review the site. We have strived to make our conclusions as transparent as possible and have made sure that readers can obtain the source materials and can repeat the calculations that underlie our text. This site is under continuous revision and is updated as more information becomes available.

Authors

Dr. Martin Sevior (Associate Professor, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)
Ms. Ivona Okuniewicz (Ph.D. Student, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)
Mr. Alaster Meehan (Ph.D. Student, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)
Mr. Gareth Jones (M.Sc. Student, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)
Mr. Damien George (Ph.D. Student, School of Physics, Universityof Melbourne)
Dr. Adrian Flitney (Research Fellow, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)
Mr. Greg Filewood (Ph.D. Student, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)

Technical Support

Dr. Lyle Winton (Research Fellow, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)

Reviewed by:

Dr. Andrew Martin (Lecturer, School of Physics, University of Melbourne)

Web Design

University of Melbourne Writing Center
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Copyright © 2017 by the contributing authors. All material on this collaboration platform is the property of the contributing authors.
This page, its contents and style, are the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views, policies or opinions of The University of Melbourne.